Lynmar 2013 Quail Hill Vineyard Pinot Noir Magnum

A few years ago we were pleasantly surprised to receive a magnum of this wine. The Lynmar 2013 Quail Hill Vineyard pinot noir magnum was a special gift to long-time members of their Advocates club.  We have extolled the virtues of wine clubs in the past, but Lynn and Anisya Fritz regularly exceed our very high expectations.  (We recently received another magnum of the 2018.  We will try to be patient.) We cracked open this bottle for our recent anniversary.

Lynn and Anisya Fritz

Lynn and Anisya Fritz

The wine might develop over the next few years, but it is delicious today.  Aromas of dark chocolate and forest floor.  The palate is black cherries with more dark chocolate and damp bark.  The finish is amazing.  Tannins are fully integrated and linger on the tongue.

 

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Thank you Lynmar for your delicious wine for our anniversary!

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While there may be a few bottles of this stashed in the Lynmar library, you can’t buy this through the winery website.  The moral is clear. When you find a winery you like, join their wine club on the spot.




Dinner at the Siduri Warehouse

Overview

Music, mood and mirth with plenty of wine at Siduri’s warehouse winery again! This year CaliforniaWineFan.com staff imbibed a Lemoravo single-vineyard pinot noir that was new to us. It’s been around for a couple of years, but with a couple score of wines in the Siduri line-up, it can be hard to keep up. Lemoravo 2017 – from the Santa Lucia highland area – is full-bodied and smooth with the recognizable characteristic flavors of pinots from the region. We took some home from the event to Silicon Valley and plan on acquiring more. This year the new winemaker – Matt Revelette – hosted the proceedings. Founder Adam Lee is now the “pinot noir ambassador” for the Jackson Family Collection global wineries.

Before getting into the details, here’s an overview video for your enjoyment.

The Event

Lemoravo Dinner at the Siduri Warehouse

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On December 14, 2019 we made the trek to Santa Rosa for the annual Siduri holiday dinner. Great food, friendly crowd, terrific wine and – bonus – an excellent duo creating music. We’ll review this event in more or less chronological order. Tasting notes will be interspersed with a description of the goings-on.

The first wine was the 2016 Van der Kamp Sonoma Mountain. Aromas of bright bing cherries with a hint of red raspberry. The palate is somewhat astringent with nice acid balance. Hold on to this one for another year. (Confession: in March we bought out the last of the 2015 vintage. Absolutely terrific.)

Moving right along, the 2016 Soberanes Santa Lucia Highlands is the real deal. Aromas of spice, cranberries, and not-quite-ripe strawberries lead to sage and dark fruit on the palate. The finish is extraordinary with flavors of baking spices and oak.

An Elf Pays a Visit

The tasting was delightfully interrupted by one of Santa’s elves. Nora Linville does a bit of everything at Siduri. Kathy and Mark Williams helped with the lively ensuing conversation. Nora was (and likely is) a real character!

 Dinner at the Siduri Warehouse

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The previously mentioned 2016 Lemoravo Santa Lucia Highlands opens with earthy, leathery, complex aromas. On the palate bing cherries with cranberry undertones. This one is great with steak.

Conversations From Wildfires to Kentucky Bourbon

We ran into some local residents and spent quite a bit of time talking about the wildfires that have plagued Sonoma and Napa counties for the past few years. We agreed that the situation needs to be improved, hopefully with the help of the U.S. Forest Service and various California agencies. As things stand now there have been decades of virtually no forest management. That means dead trees and lots of dry brush, creating a tinderbox. (If you’re not familiar with California there is virtually no rain from April through October. Late in the dry season moisture levels in the vegetation are very low. Which is why September through November is fire season.)

One surprising topic of agreement was Williamson Wines. We all agreed that the Williamson business model was terrific. Don’t bother with retail, just use a wine club and create a terrific tasting room experience.

The Sierra del Mar 2016 was earthier with aromas of dark fruit. More dark fruit on the palate with a nice spice overlay.

At dinner we were fortunate to be seated next to Sherrie, the wine club coordinator. She and her husband Chris are immigrants from Georgia (the state, not the country). Their daughter Sara attended the University of Kentucky on a full scholarship. When she graduated, the family did the full bourbon trail. “Oh my God we had so much fun.”

Which seems an apt summary of our evening at Siduri.

 




Belden Barns Hosting Virtual Wine Tasting

Belden Barns is hosting a series of virtual wine tastings starting at the end of March.  Here’s the idea.  You order wine from them.  Then you participate in the virtual tasting via Zoom.  But you have to move fast if you want the 11 bottle package with one bottle of each wine.  Orders must be placed by MARCH 19 (tomorrow as I type this). Added bonus: a 35 percent discount on those 11 bottle near-cases. Click here for the order page.  Also a pdf version of the complete e-mail is at the end of this article.

Here’s what Nate and Lauren say:

In other, more exciting news, beginning on Sunday, March 29th, Nate and I will be hosting free virtual wine tastings every Sunday evening at 5 to 6pm PST.  Each week, we’ll explore a new varietal/bottling from our portfolio, inviting participants to weigh in on attributes like taste, appearance, and perfect pairing ideas.  On the agenda will be fun experiments to explore how the taste of wine changes when paired with different random items from your stockpile (think: beans, marshmallows, rice, peanut butter, popcorn, mac & cheese, etc).  We’ll also include fun questions like “Which song would go best with this wine?” and “If this wine were to come to life as a celebrity, who might it be?”

And here’s the schedule.
Sunday, March 29th      Sauvignon Blanc
Sunday, April 5th           Pinot Noir (a comparison between our Estate and Serendipity bottlings)
Sunday, April 12th         Gruner Veltliner
Sunday, April 19th         Rosé
Sunday, April 26th         Grenache
Sunday, May 3rd           Blanc de Noirs (sparkling!)
Sunday, May 10th         Syrah (a comparison between our Estate and Cadabra bottlings)
Sunday, May 17th         Chardonnay
Sunday, May 24th         Late-Harvest Viognier

Here’s the pdf of the e-mail.

Belden Barns virtual tasting




Dinner at Siduri Preview

On December 14, 2019 we made the trek to Santa Rosa for the annual Siduri holiday dinner.  Great food, friendly crowd, terrific wine and – bonus – an excellent duo creating music.

We’ll get into the details in a future post. For now, here’s an overview video for your enjoyment.




Two WALT Bargains at Artisan

WALT La Brisa Two WALT Bargains at Artisan

Artisan Wine Depot is currently featuring two WALT pinot noirs at bargain prices. We’ve written about WALT several times before. When we read about this we rushed over to pick up a couple of bottles of each. And they could not be more different. One is from the Sonoma Coast, the other from Anderson Valley. Each is an excellent reflection of the terroir of its respective AVA. (Prices quoted are in effect at Artisan as of February 14, 2020.)

WALT Blue Jay Two WALT Bargains at ArtisanWALT’s 2017 La Brisa ($36.97) is a blend of three Sonoma Coast vineyards: Bob’s Ranch, Gap’s Crown, and Calesa. Gaps Crown is up in the hills. In our experience, the grapes most closely resemble Anderson Valley. That explains why this Sonoma Coast is lighter than we’d expect.

The wine is on the red side of-purple with aromas of rose petal, tangerine peel red raspberries. Medium-bodied with flavors of crushed raspberry, cola, freshly turned soil, and tobacco linger on the palate. The texture is rich and leads into a long finish with balanced oak and minerality.

The 2017 Blue Jay ($39.99) is from hillside vineyards in the Anderson Valley. The color is lighter than La Brisa, tending away from purple and toward ruby. Aromas of blood orange, strawberries with hints of forest floor. Complexity on the palate shows flavors of wild blueberries, baking spice and red raspberries. The long finish is smooth tannins, oak, and balanced acidity.

 




The End of an Era at Siduri

On November 16, 2019, we received an e-mail with news that marks the end of an era at Siduri.  Adam Lee is stepping down as winemaker.  The 2019 vintage will be his last.  I’ve included a pdf of the e-mail below.

Matt Revelette and Adam Lee The End of an Era at Siduri

Matt Revelette and Adam Lee

The good news is that he’s found a replacement.  Say hello to Matt Revelette who will take over winemaking duties starting in a few months.  Matt worked with Adam on the 2019 vintage.  The two traveled together visiting vineyards and generally having a good time.  Adam conducted an extensive search and has found a good one.  From the Wine Industry Advisor,

Revelette came to Siduri from Sojourn Cellars, where he spent three years managing all aspects of the winery, from grower relations to wine production. Prior to Sojourn, Revelette held winemaking roles with venerable Pinot Noir producers, such as Williams Selyem and Kosta Browne.

Adam and Dianna Lee produced their first vintage in 1994.  They were pioneers in many ways.  Siduri was one of the first warehouse wineries, owning no vineyards at all.  Instead, the pair worked closely with selected vineyard owners to help achieve the grape quality Siduri wanted.  They also were among the first to implement small-lot single-vineyard production. But after 25 years it was time to move on. Two kids from Texas did good. From the Siduri website:

Buoyed by that dream, Adam Lee and Dianna Novy left their native Texas and moved to the Sonoma County wine country. They spent years working at small, family-owned wineries and using any and all free time learning everything they could about growing grapes and making wine.

And it paid off—the first Siduri Wines release, in 1994, was met with great critical success. About that same time, perhaps not coincidentally, Adam and Dianna married.

Two Stories From History

One memory stands out.  After the Tubbs Fire destroyed much of northeastern Santa Rosa in October, 2017, the winery was left without power. Adam didn’t even know if he still had a winery.  He walked three miles to the location and was relieved to see that Siduri was still standing.  He asked Ryan Zapaltas to join him at the winery because they had a big problem.

In October, the crush is over and fermentation is well underway.  That process generates heat.  The tanks have cooling jackets.  But no power means no pumps which means no cooling. Adam and Ryan bought dry ice (solid carbon dioxide) and wrapped it around the tanks.  The 2017 vintage was saved because the two were persistent and creative.  Ryan took over winemaking duties at Copain.  We hope he will bring his style to that winery, making Copain a destination winery for us.

Second was a special event. Adam was kind enough to invite us to a tasting of Virginia wines on June 23, 2014.  That was our first exposure to that state’s winemaking.  We were so impressed we started VirginiaWineFan.

The Future

Adam is not retiring to a life of leisure.  He is still heavily involved with his baby, the Clarice Wine Company.

The End of an Era at Siduri

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Adam will also serve as Pinot Noir Advocate for the Jackson Family Wine conglomerate.  That company owns many excellent pinot noir producers including Maggy Hawk, Hartford, and (of course) Siduri.

Conclusion

Thanks to Adam for years and years of terrific wine.  We wish him nothing but the best.  And we’re looking forward to tasting Matt’s first vintage, 2020.

Adam closed his letter with this:

Making Siduri Pinot Noirs was great. Sharing them with you all was far better.

We are happy that we were able to share with Adam.

Adam Lee Leaving Siiduri

 




Sonoma Mountain versus Westside Paso Robles 2016 Vintage

Last night we cracked open two bottles of pinot noir, both 2016 vintage.  One was the Belden Barns Serendipity block.  The second was Jack Creek Cellars Estate Reserve.  The former is in the Sonoma Mountain AVA just east of Santa Rosa.  Jack Creek is in the Westside district of the Paso Robles AVA.  We are long-time club members of both these fine wineries.  This is our Sonoma Mountain versus Westside Paso Robles 2016 vintage tasting competition.

At the outset, we’ll confirm your suspicions.  Both these wines are terrific right now.  The Belden Barns entry will probably improve a bit with one more year in the cellar.  We’re old and impatient.

Both of these need time to breathe. Immediately after opening the bottles, each wine had excessive earthy notes both aromatically and on the palate.  The Jack Creek developed in about 15 minutes.  We decanted the Belden Barns to encourage it.  To put it mildly, a little air was just what they needed.

The Jack Creek offering opened with aromas of cherries and spice.  The palate is cherries and huckleberries with a solid underpinning of earthiness.  The finish is long and exquisite with silky tannins and a nice acid balance.

Belden Barns opened with rose petals and cherries with a hint of brambleberry on the nose.  The palate was more cherries with a solid spice base and a nice acid balance.  You could easily cellar this for another year, but we suspect anything longer than that would be excessive.

Comparing the two led to an unusual result.  We are accustomed to the idea that the further north the vineyard, the lighter the pinot (palate, not color).  In this case, the Jack Creek was lighter.  Once again the importance of microclimates shows itselfNorma preferred the Jack Creek while I liked the Belden Barns.  Which makes for both a good tasting experience and a good marriage!




En Route Redux

Les Pommiers En Route Redux

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We discovered En Route pinot noir at Pinotfest 2015.  And we were very impressed.  On Norma’s recent birthday we took a chance on The Post, a new local restaurant (full review forthcoming, stay tuned).  On the wine list was “Nickel & Nickel Russian River Valley “Les Pommiers” pinot noir.” That sounded familiar, so we took a chance.  But, frankly, it’s hard to screw up grapes from the RRV AVA.

When the wine arrived, Norma looked at it and noticed that the label said En Route, not Nickel & Nickel.  I did a quick search of CaliforniaWineFan on my phone and found our old review. Sure enough, this is  one of the sisters of that winery.

We are, if anything, more impressed with the 2016 vintage ($60) and priced fairly at $75 at The Post.  We can do no better than the sensory description from their website.

En Route Sensory Evaluation En Route Redux

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RN Estate 2012 Pinot Noir Solomon Hills

RN Estate 2012 pinot noir

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If you have a bottle of this beauty laying around, don’t hesitate to open it.  Aromas of bing and black cherries.  The palate features one of the finest, silkiest tannin finishes I’ve ever tasted.  Mid-palate of cola and spice with a hint of cinnamon.  Outstanding.  And worth every minute of the wait. Added bonus: the RN Estate 2012 pinot noir Solomon Hills is available as a library selection for the bargain price of $49.  Scroll to the bottom of the current releases page to find it.




Hahn Visits Artisan

Long-time readers will remember our admiration for Hahn Family Wines.  We were delighted to be invited to a tasting by our friends at Artisan Wine DepotHahn visits Artisan and we are there to report on the event. As always, all prices are from Artisan.

Browsing the Hahn website, we discovered the fascinating biographies of the Hahn family.  I’ll include photos and bio sketches between wine reviews.  Let’s start with co-founder Nicky Hahn.

Nicky Hahn Hahn Visits Artisan

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There were ten wines on the menu.  In the interest of promoting only the best, we’ll limit our review to five of them.  (Naturally, we’ll skip the Smith & Hook cabernet sauvignon and the Boneshaker zinfandel.)

Hahn’s 2016 Monterey County chardonnay ($16) is a bargain. The opening is tropical aromas of citrus, and orange zest. The palate is more citrus with a nice acid balance and  luscious mouth-feel.

Gaby Hahn Hahn Visits Artisan

Co-founder Gaby Hahn (click for larger image)

The 2016 “SLH” Santa Lucia Highlands pinot noir ($20) is also a bargain. This one is the forest floor – earthy style. The nose is ripe cherry fruit with touches of newly-plowed earth. The palate features dark berry flavors, with hints of spice and dried thyme.

Philip Hahn Hahn Visits Artisan

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Lucienne is one of Hahn’s higher-end labels.  The 2016 Smith Vineyard Santa Lucia Highlands pinot noir ($45) begins with enticing aromas of strawberry and blackberry with a hint of chocolate. The palate features dark fruit, especially plums with spice undertones. Add a nice acid balance and this is a winner.

Caroline Hahn Hahn Visits Artisan

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The 2016 Doctor’s Vineyard Santa Lucia Highlands pinot noir ($45) is a good illustration of why terroir matters, even at the vineyard level. Aromas are toward the earthy end with hints of leather and, unusually, cedar. Flavors feature wild raspberries, blackberries and more cedar.  Incidentally, this vineyard is named in honor of Dr. Caroline Hahn (see bio sketch above).

It was a pleasure to be reminded of this outstanding winery.




Three Excellent Pinots From Gregory James

We wrote a brief review of Gregory James Wines in Part 2 of our Garagiste Northern Exposure preview.  We liked their wine so much we ordered half a case.  We’ve now tasted each of the three wines. We were not disappointed.  And, as an added bonus, their 2014 Patchy Fog Vineyard is a major bargain at $31.

Hawk Hill 2014

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The 2013 Hawk Hill Vineyard Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($48) opens with aromas of earth and leather.  The palate is bright bing cherries and notes of spice with a hint of cranberry.  The finish is long and complex with lingering spice. This wine will improve even more with another year or two in the cellar. (We also have several bottles of the 2014 but two seemed like enough for last night.  We’ll add to this review in the coming days.)

The 2014 Hawk Hill Vineyard Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($48) carries a lesson in how the California wine industry has evolved.  If you have any friends who still believe vintage doesn’t matter in California wines, have them taste this side by side with the 2013.  The two could not be more different.  This one starts with aromas of bing cherries and raspberries leading to bright cherries on the palate.  The characteristic long finish with a terrific acid – tannin balance rounds out a great experience.

Patchy Fog 2014

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The 2014 Patchy Fog Vineyard Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($31, major bargain!) begins with lush, ripe aromas of black cherries and chocolate.  The palate is more black cherries, a bit of licorice, and a hint of spice.  Another long, complex finish makes this a terrific experience.

 

About Gregory James

The winery name is a combination of the first names of the two owners.  Greg Adams is the winemaker and viticulturist.  Jim Demuth is the president and handles the business side of the operation.  They share a mutual love of the land and grapegrowing — in fact, they met while digging around in a vineyard.

Greg (left) and Jim

Greg (left) and Jim (click for larger image)

From their website:

Site matters to Gregory James.

We grow and source our grapes from vineyards located within the maritime reach of the Pacific Ocean. Here, the cool foggy nights and mornings dramatically shroud the varied terrain producing grapes of remarkable intensity and character.

Our vineyard sites are tucked away among rolling hills, bucolic valleys and dramatic ridge tops of the West Sonoma Coast where each location tells its own story.

We invite you to share in the hard won results of farming in the extreme coastal environment of the Pacific Ocean. 

Greg and Jim actually have help from a third partner.

Charley the third partner

Charley the vineyard doodle. “Fastest doodle in the west.”

Charley joined the family in 2009 thanks to a gift from cherished friends Paul & Jamie. He has been an integral part of the wine team specializing in moral support and gopher scenting. He leads a charmed life in the hills and vineyards of the Sonoma Coast.

 

 

 




Garagiste Northern Exposure in Sonoma Preview Part 2

This is part 2 of our preview of Garagiste Northern Exposure.  We advise reading Part 1 first if you haven’t already.

As an overview note, many wineries were pouring 2013 and/or 2014 vintages.  We preferred the 2013’s by and large.

Gregory James Wines is, like several others, named after owner Jim Demuth and winemaker Greg Adams. Their pal Jenny greeted us and gave us the rundown on the wines and the winery.  She was pouring two 2014 pinots.  The Hawk Hill Vineyard ($48) and the Patchy Fog Vineyard ($31) are both on the western edge of the Sonoma Coast AVA just outside Freestone, a town south of Occidental and west of Sebastopol.  In other words, terrific terroir.  And the wines are excellent.

 

Fallon Place Wines was represented by winemaker Cory Michal.  The winery is named after Fallon Place on Russian Hill in San Francisco, one of the famous staircase walkways in the city.  Cory used to make a barrel of wine on the landing outside his apartment when he lived there.  Luckily for us, he turned professional.  His 2016 Herbitage Vineyard ($38) is an excellent representative of the Carneros AVA.  It will improve over the next few years, so be patient.

 

Betwixt Wines featured owner-winemaker Tim Tello.  They, too, are located in San Francisco.  Their 2015 pinot noir ($40) is from Anderson Valley’s Helluva Vineyard (say it out loud).  Tim makes about 450 cases per year including grenache, grenache rosé, and chardonnay.  The pinot is all of 85 cases so get it while you can.

 

La Pitchoune Winery was our last stop of the day.  Owner Tracy Nielsen greeted us with enough enthusiasm to bolster our flagging energy.  They featured two pinots, both 2014.  One is a Sonoma Coast blend ($48).  The other is from the Holder Vineyard in the Russian River Valley ($68).  Tracy offered us their 2017 Sonoma Coast vin gris of pinot noir ($28), a heavier style of rosé.  That process preserves more of the pinot character while still retaining rosé quaffability.  All three wines were as charming as Tracy herself.  Incidentally, La Pitchoune is a Provençal expression for “the little one”, deriving from the Occitan word pichon.  It’s also the name Julia and Paul Child gave to their cottage in Provence.  Which, by the way, you can now rent on AirBnB. (For our regular readers, Tracy is quite familiar with Picayune Cellars. We’ve written about them several times.)




Garagiste Northern Exposure in Sonoma Preview Part 1

On May 12 we traveled north to the town of Sonoma for the first Garagiste event north of Paso Robles: Garagiste Northern Exposure.  And we were not disappointed.  We found eight new wineries, each producing at least one pinot noir.  Quality varied from very good to outstanding.  This is part 1 of our summary in roughly the order we tasted the wines.  We’ll publish part 2 followed by more in-depth articles about individual wineries in the future.

As an overview note, many wineries were pouring 2013 and/or 2014 vintages.  We preferred the 2013’s by and large.

Burning Bench Cellars owner, grapegrower, winemaker, and bottle washer David Mease greeted us.  These folks only make pinot noir.  And it’s really good.  All 175 cases per year are from their Moon Hill Vineyard in the North Coast, Marin County AVA.  The 2013 and 2014 vintages are $45 each.

 

Camlow Cellars offers their Magna Porcum Estate Pinot Noir. Yes, that’s a wild boar in their logo.  The winery name is a hybrid of the names of owner Alan Campbell and winemaker Craig Strehlow.  They make all of 400 cases per year, including a pinot noir rosé featuring the winery mascot, Pigasus.

 

Von Holt Wines featured two 2014 pinots, both Sonoma Coast.  The Sonoma Coast blend is $35, while the Suacci Vineyard is $45.  Both are excellent.  Co-owner Chris Von Holt probably has no problem collecting his accounts receivable.  The winery is his second career.  He retired after 20 years as a Secret Service agent.  (The other co-owner is his wife Pam.)

 

Charlie Chenoweth greeted us with an amazing story about Chenoweth Wines.  Charlie grew up in agriculture.  In 1980 they ripped out their vegetables and planted grapes. And we sure are happy they did.  Their pinots are a blend of three vineyards: Treehouse, Bootlegger’s, and the estate Home Ranch.  The 2013 is $55 and the 2014 is $65.

 

More coming, hopefully next week.




Colene Clemens Vineyard 2014 Dopp Creek (Chehalem Mountain) Pinot Noir

2014-Dopp-Creek-Pinot-Noir-FullOur friends at Artisan Wine Depot recommended the Colene Clemens Dopp Creek pinot noir. Lush aromas of strawberries and dark fruit. Lush, dense palate of black cherries with bright acid and spicy tannins. Long finish with notes of five spice and more tannins. Artisan’s price: $24.97 a bottle. They have just a few bottles left, but are expecting more soon.

Click to get to their website.  For our full review, click here.




A Day in Paso Robles

When William and Katherine invited us to spend two nights at The Canyon Villa, we jumped at the chance. As always, the food, friendship, and accommodations were superb. We got January off to a good start by spending a day in Paso Robles. And we found two terrific wineries we did not know about. As an added bonus, we were the first to visit the tasting room at a third winery that doesn’t even open until February.

Lauren and Leslee A Day in Paso Robles

Lauren Rava and Leslee Falkenberg of Rava Wines (click for larger image)

We promised Lauren and Leslee that we wouldn’t do a full write-up of Rava Wines until they release their full wine lineup next month. We’ll just say that what we tasted shows a lot of promise and potential. We’ll write a longer review in February.  But you can taste their excellent sparkler and albariño right now. They are also pouring a selection of Brophy-Clark wines.  (John Clark is doing double duty as the winemaker at both Brophy-Clark and Rava.) Make an apopointment first. And ask for a tour of the spectacular facilities. By the way, Rava is a must-visit for the scenery, architecture, and good vibes. Those planning a wedding or other event should consider this place.

Ryan and Grace A Day in Paso Robles

Ryan and Grace (click for larger image)

Next up was Deovlet Wines (pronounced Dev’-let). We were greeted by Ryan Deovlet and Grace. Three outstanding pinot noirs led to one question: why haven’t we found these folks before? It turns out that we had visited their tasting room once. But it was occupied by 4 Vines.

Dilecta dog wants to play A Day in Paso Robles

Dilecta dog wants to play

Finally, we arrived at Dilecta. William and Katherine have their wines on The Canyon Villa’s in-house wine list. We were greeted enthusiastically by the winery’s golden retriever who was eager to play. Owner – winemaker Orion Stang rescued us from the puppy and proceeded to pour us some yummy GSMs. We’re normally not big fans of Rhône-style blends, but Dilecta has made us believers.

Dilecta's Orion Stang and Tony A Day in Paso Robles

Dilecta’s Orion Stang and Tony (click for larger image)

Three for three on the day. And 2018 is off to a very, very good start.