Champagne and Burgundy at Artisan

Champagne Louis Barthelemy Maison Champagne and Burgundy at Artisan
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Our buddies at Artisan Wine Depot invited us to a mega-tasting December 4. Featuring 17 Burgundies and Champagnes, this event was a challenge to our palates. Rather than write an extensive review, we’ll just look at our two favorites. We bought several bottles of each.

Sandrine et Stéphane Briday Champagne and Burgundy at Artisan

Sandrine et Stéphane Briday

Louis Barthelemy "Brut Rubis" NV Brut Rosé Champagne Champagne and Burgundy at Artisan

Louis Barthelemy “Brut Rubis” NV Brut Rosé Champagne (click for larger image)

Domaine Michel Briday NV Crémant de Bourgogne Brut Champagne and Burgundy at Artisan

Domaine Michel Briday NV Crémant de Bourgogne Brut (click for larger image)

Domaine Michel Briday offered their NV Crémant de Bourgogne Brut ($26). White peaches, honeysuckle, cinnamon and a hint of secondary fermentation. Not bubbly enough to qualify as a sparkler and too far south to be called Champagne, but the enclosure is designed to keep the carbon dioxide in the mix. Highly recommended and a bargain. This wine is 40% Chardonnay, 40% Pinot Noir, and 20% Aligoté.

Louis Barthelemy brought their “Brut Rubis” NV Brut Rosé Champagne ($39). We usually don’t like rosé, especially in sparklers. But this is an exception. Notes of raspberry, pineapple with a smoky minerality in the background. Can be aged through 2020 if you have the patience. We don’t. In the best Champagne tradition, this is 70% Chardonnay and 25% Pinot Noir.

For those who are interested, the complete tasting list is here (pdf file). Scanned directly from the Artisan handouts, you may blame typos and any other errors on them.

About the author

Tony Lima has been a California wine fan since arriving in California from the east coast in 1974. He's lived the growth and expansion of the industry first hand. He's seen the fickle California Wine consumer fads pop up and burst... the craze for Zinfandel, then oaky Chardonnay, then Merlot, now Pinot Noir. His day job was Professor of Economics at California State University located in Hayward. (He retired in 2016.) His undergrad degree in chemical engineering (MIT) and his MBA ( Harvard) and Ph.D. Economics (Stanford) are the root of his interest in the Business of Wine. He is a card-carrying member of the AAWE - American Association of Wine Economists.

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