Maggy Hawk Hawkster 2012

Maggy Hawk Featured
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Almost exactly one year ago we were delighted to receive our 2011 Hawkster.  We reviewed it very favorably.  So last week when we received an e-mail offering the 2012 vintage, we jumped at the chance.

Maggy Hawk Hawkster 2012

We often say that we don’t choose when to make the Hawkster, rather it chooses – or demands – the years in which it wants to be made. This is only the second time since the winery’s founding that we have released a Hawkster Pinot Noir. With 177 cases made, we hope you are as thrilled with this special allocation offering as we are.

Here’s what estate manager Brooke Gadke said →

The 2012 Hawkster ($66) is on the earthy side compared to the 2011.  Bright cherry aromas with undertones of rose petals.  On the palate more cherries with spice and tannins.  We bought three bottles and will let the remaining two age for another year or so.  The price is still $66 and it’s still a bargain.

Owner Barbara Banke is a huge fan of Anderson Valley grapes.  She describes the vineyards being located in “The Deep End:”

Situated adjacent to the redwoods and one of the last vineyards before one reaches the Pacific, the Maggy Hawk vineyard is located in what many refer to as the “deep end” of Anderson Valley.

The vineyard contains a complex patchwork of different facings, slopes and clones, all of which conspire to provide a dazzling array of different Pinot Noirs. The soil is comprised of decomposed sandstone, known for exceptional drainage and low nutrients, both critical to the development of naturally balanced vines.

As one might expect, yields are controlled by Mother Nature in this setting; in most years, the Maggy Hawk vineyard provides no more than two tons per acre.

 

About the author

Tony Lima has been a California wine fan since arriving in California from the east coast in 1974. He's lived the growth and expansion of the industry first hand. He's seen the fickle California Wine consumer fads pop up and burst... the craze for Zinfandel, then oaky Chardonnay, then Merlot, now Pinot Noir. His day job was Professor of Economics at California State University located in Hayward. (He retired in 2016.) His undergrad degree in chemical engineering (MIT) and his MBA ( Harvard) and Ph.D. Economics (Stanford) are the root of his interest in the Business of Wine. He is a card-carrying member of the AAWE - American Association of Wine Economists.

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